Courses

University Honors Courses 

University Honors students can complete their UH course enrollment one of two ways:

  1. Complete one UH course per year.
     
  2. Complete two UH courses in either the first or second (sophomore) years. If a student chooses this option, they can combine the remaining two UH courses in any way that works; however, it is not an option to complete two courses a second time.

In summary, students must take at least one class freshman and sophomore year. Below is an outline that displays five UH course completion options:

Year in SchoolOption 1Option 2Option 3Option 4Option 5
First12211
Second11122
Third11010
Fourth10101

 

Spring 2024
 

CUE 1001, Sect. 550:  Culture Industry and Creative Economy (3 credits)
Course# 67845 
Tues/Thr 2 - 3:15pm, UH Classroom (KAML 119)
Global Perspectives
Dr. Aparna Katre 

This course is an introduction to the history, development and contemporary scope of the creative economy. In the past, the United States and the global economy heavily relied on industrial production, yet today a distinctive shift to a creative economy based on cultural products has occurred. Arts and crafts, tourism, entertainment, sports, digital mass media, food and beverage products – all these generate an increasing percentage of our overall economic output, and provide a multitude of entrepreneurial opportunities. The course introduced students to the academic discipline of cultural entrepreneurship, which studies how change agents organize cultural, financial, social and human capital to generate income and promote economic growth from cultural activities. Through case studies and contemporary examples, students develop an appreciation of the diversity of material cultures in the United States and around the globe. The course emphasizes critical examination of the impact of commercialization of ethnic, native and global products on the populations that generated them. Community-based project work constitutes 50% of the grade and is the basis to achieve the learning objectives of this course. It provides the platform to learn both the hard and soft skills crucial to operate in the creative economy.

 

FA 1102, Sect. 550: Creating Art, Sec. 550 (3 credits)
Class #47042
MWF 12-12:50 pm, Montague Hall 206
Dr. Justin Rubin 
Fine Arts

No textbooks, only hands-on interactive learning. What do we do? We make films when you've never made one before, create an illuminated manuscript, study paintings of recluses and hold lively discussions on how and why people never stop making interesting things from every era and perspective.

 

HLTH 3341, Sect. 550: UH Encountering Death and Grief: A cross-cultural Journey (3 credits)
Class #65406
Tuesday3:30 - 6:20 pm, Sports & Health Center 207
Cultural Diversity in the US
Dr. Mitzi Doane

This class incorporates field trips and guest speakers who come from different cultures, religions or death experiences (such as loss due to suicide, murder, accident). Students have an opportunity to explore death via reading and discussion including such topics as capital punishment, the right to die, war. The class is not a lecture, it is a seminar where there is a free give and take.

 

HON 3305, Sec. 550: UH French Cuisine Exploring French Culture Through Food (3 credits)
MW: 4-6pm, UH Classroom (KAML 119)
Dr. Dana Lindaman
Humanities and Global Perspectives

This course is taught in English and will use food as an entry point into a deeper exploration of French identity, including analysis of important contemporary issues related to gender, class, and sustainability. Students will study the ways in which French society has sought to establish order and symmetry around the table, a focal point of French society, and the many points of creative resistance to that order.

 

PHIL 2021, Sec. 550: Science and Pseudoscience: Thinking about weird things (3 credits)
Class #67721
MWF 9 - 9:50 AM, Bohannon Hall 343
Dr. Robert Schroer
Humanities

A critical introduction to the nature of knowledge and belief by focusing on contemporary issues, such as UFOs, ESP, mysticism, creationism and evolution, and near-death experiences, which explains the differences between rational beliefs and articles of faith and between science and pseudo-science.

 

WRIT 3180, Sec 550: UH Advanced Writing
Class# 46444
T & Th 9:30 - 10:45, Cina Hall 214
Rebecca Boyle, MFA

**Senior and Junior UH students will have priority access, then sophomores and first-year students who are interested if they have completed 60 credits and seats remain.

Develops research, critical thinking, and collaborative writing strategies as well as rhetorical skills to draft documents in multiple genres for multiple audiences. This includes professional correspondence and reports, research proposals, literature reviews, oral presentations, and related documents for the honors project as well as the production and publication of Aisthesis, UH's own interdisciplinary honors journal. If you want to take this course, email Joelle McGovern ([email protected]) to process your request.

 

Fall 2023

AMIN 3640, Sect. 550:  21st Century Native Literature: American Indian Writing Published in the New Millennium (3 credits)
Class #13598
Cultural Diversity in the US | Humanities
TuTh 2:00PM - 3:15PM
Dr. Carter Meland

Exploring novels, poetry, memoir, short fiction, essays, and other forms of literary writing composed since the year 2000, this class examines these works for the ways they engage with and extend critical themes of American Indian cultural and political resurgence in the 21st century. 

 

  1. AMIN 3640 requires, as part of the class, the creation of a documentary short film. In support of that work we are collaborating with the Minnesota Media Arts School (MMA) to offer UH students the unique chance to further develop their skills in filmmaking and storytelling. UH students enrolled in AMIN 3640 can CHOOSE to augment that course experience by taking a class (Introduction to Documentary) with the MMA School at the Zeitgeist FREE OF CHARGE. In Intro to Documentary students will learn production, lighting, sound recording, cinematography, writing, and editing skills among many others that can be used in the creation of their final project (and throughout life as video content becomes more and more pervasive).

    The MMA documentary class can also be shaped into an NCE in one of two ways.
     
    • Complete AMIN 3640 and the Documentary class and volunteer at least 10 hours supporting MMA/Zeitgeist initiatives over the course of the year. If you do those three things you will have completed your course and your civic engagement non-course experience.
       
    • Do NOT take AMIN 3640 but complete the Documentary class, create an actual documentary (or documentary short) and volunteer at least five hours supporting MMA/Zeitgeist initiatives over the course of that year. This would count as a creative expression NCE.  

      **If students are interested in taking the Intro to Documentary film class (whether they decide to take AMIN 3640 or not) they must notify Joelle ([email protected]) of their interest via email. Seats will first be apportioned to students enrolled in AMIN 3640. Remaining seats will be assigned on a first come, first served basis to all other UH students until we reach the class max.
  2. AMIN 3640 currently has a prerequisite of 30 credits. If you are under 30 credits you can still take the course. You just have to email Professor Meland ([email protected]) and ask to be added to the roster.

 


ANTH 1602, Sect. 550:  Biological Anthropology and Archaeology (4 credits)
Class# 32794
Social Sciences
MoWe 9 - 10:50am
Dr. Jennifer Jones

Origin and development of extinct and living human forms, primatology, human biological variations, the race concept, evolution, and development of human societies up to the earliest stages of ancient civilizations.   Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: ANTH 1601


DN 1151, Sect. 550: Modern Dance Technique I (2 credits - Fine Arts)
Class# 12184 
Fine Arts
MWF 1:30-2:40pm
Dr. Rebecca Katz Harwood

Previous dance training or experience is welcomed but not required for this class, just a desire to move and a willingness to try! Modern Dance Technique I is designed to introduce Modern Dance as both a historical form and contemporary practice and intended to develop Modern Dance skills with emphasis on placement, coordination, balance, and musicality.  Concurring with Liberal Education objectives, the course will provide opportunities for creative expression through active participation and presentation of dancing via class exercises and projects.  In addition, students will develop an appreciation for the diverse cultural influences on, and stylistic variety in, Modern Dance as a performance dance form.  The majority of course work is the actual dancing; it will be supported by video viewings, selected readings, and some written reflection work. 


HON 3033, Sect. 550 – The World of Surfing  (4 credits)
Class# 32575
Global Perspectives
Tu Th – 9:15 am – 10:45am
Dr. Scott Laderman

Surfing is one of the world's most popular cultural phenomena. While the number of actual surfers is relatively small – probably between five and ten million people – the sport's reach has historically extended far beyond the limited community of wave riders, influencing everything from fashion and music to film, photography, tourism, and marketing. This class will explore how a pastime commonly associated with mindless pleasure has in fact been implicated in some of the major global developments of the last two-hundred years, such as empire-building and the "civilizing mission" in nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century Hawai'i, modernization and economic development in the so-called Third World, the growth of international tourism following the Second World War, political mass movements and the antiapartheid struggle, American foreign relations and Cold War cultural diplomacy, and the surf industry and corporate globalization. The course also has an experiential component; to develop an appreciation for the subject and for why millions of people have planned their lives around the sport, you will learn to surf. 


HON 3495 Section 550, Community Immersion and Entrepreneurship (3 credits)
Class #10723
WF 9:15-10:45 am
Social Science
Dr. Aparna Katre

This is a seminar course and it involves once a week (Wednesday) off-campus meetings in downtown Duluth and engagement in situ with community partners. The course is designed to facilitate long-term collaborations between the University and the Twin Ports community to respond entrepreneurially to community issues. It provides a framework for thoughtful, sustained engagement where responses to community issues are developed organically, collaboratively, and with grassroots participation. Supported by theories for social change, such as systems thinking, intersectionality and entrepreneurship, students immerse themselves in projects to strengthen the community. The emphasis is on building a sound grasp of the topics by connecting them to community issues and entrepreneurial activities.

 

Spring 2023
 

FA 1102: Creating Art, Sec. 550, #47275
Dr. Justin Rubin | MWF 12-12:50 pm
Fine Arts

No textbooks, only hands-on interactive learning. What do we do? We make films when you've never made one before, create an illuminated manuscript, study paintings of recluses and hold lively discussions on how and why people never stop making interesting things from every era and perspective.

HON 1003: From Beethoven to the Beatles, Sec. 550, #45724
Dr. Tom Wegren | MWF 10 - 10:50 am
Fine Arts

Beethoven to the Beatles develops basic musicianship, enhances artistic expressive awareness, provides historical and cross-cultural contexts, and encourages creative and analytical thinking through written expression. World-music perspectives are presented with live piano performances. Music can only be really alive when there are listeners who are really aware. Learning how to listen to and what to listen for in music is vital to artistic growth. Aaron Copland, the Dean of American Composers, said: “To listen intently, to listen consciously, to listen with one’s whole intelligence is the least we can do in furtherance of an art that is one of the glories of mankind.


HON 3895: The Ethics of Call Out Culture, Sec. 550, #45747   
Dr. Jeanine Weekes Schroer | MWF 9 - 9:50 am
Cultural Diversity in the US

Public shaming is not new, but social media has upped the stakes. People have lost jobs, careers, and even their lives in the aftermath of something as simple as a scolding on Twitter.  This also makes Twitter one of the main destinations for some of the most important discourses of our time: Genuinely diverse communities come together to communicate within and across boundaries about racism, sexism, homophobia, and ableism.  By reading ethicists, feminists, critical race theorists, and black feminist theorists, and their thinking on the purpose of blame, the importance of public blame, the challenges of shame, the epistemic challenges of structural oppression, the challenges of social media, this course will map an Ethics for the age of the Call-out.  


WRIT 3180: UH Advanced Writing,  Sec. 550, #46599
Rebecca Boyle, MFA : T & Th 11-12:15pm
**Senior and Junior UH students will have priority access, then sophomores and first-year students who are interested if they have completed 60 credits and seats remain.

Develops research, critical thinking, and collaborative writing strategies as well as rhetorical skills to draft documents in multiple genres for multiple audiences. This includes professional correspondence and reports, research proposals, literature reviews, oral presentations, and related documents for the honors project as well as the production and publication of Aisthesis, UH's own interdisciplinary honors journal. If you want to take this course, email Joelle McGovern ([email protected]) to process your request.

 

Fall 2022

AST 1050, Sect. 550, Native Skywatchers #32627
Tuesday & Thursday,  3 - 4:15pm
Cultural Diversity in the US
Dr. James Rock

Our Universal Story usually opens with “Once upon a SpaceTime…” and the very first stuff that would become our bodies today came from the stars and existed long before there was ever a first day on Earth! Is this idea from modern western science or from ancient Indigenous scientists? The answer is: “Yes! Star-Stuff-R-Us…by way of nucleosynthesis, but also according to Dakota Otokahekagapi.”

We have always been both scientists and storytellers who carefully read and told the story as written in Nature. Indigenous ethno- and archaeo-astronomy (IE&AA) looks at the ways in which the motion and cycles of celestial bodies as measured from architectural structures and natural features at sacred places can provide an essential framework for daily and seasonal activities, social and political relationships, and ethical and spiritual beliefs, including a 26,000 year cycle. How can and do we still live the “M”yth now as then? How and why is there “Math in the Myth?”

The answers to these place-based Indigenous science questions will likely lead you to even more questions, ideas and hypotheses. The interdisciplinary nature of ethnoastronomy combines and applies astronomy, cultural astronomy, cultural anthropology, archaeology, history, architecture and even linguistics, dance, music, games, mathematics and technology to investigate and interpret many kinds of evidence. We search and synthesize these fields as we first come to appreciate, then respect and honor the deep wisdom of our Elders and ancestors as it was preserved, passed down and still comes alive within us.

BIOL 2001, Sect. 550, Our Food:  Science, Nutrition and Production #13065
Mon, Wed, Fri,  9 – 9:50 am
Sustainability
Dr. Paul Bates

This course will examine 3 large aspects of the food we eat: food science, human nutrition, and agricultural production methods.  We will look at the main components of food, and how manipulation of food molecules creates different flavors, textures, and structures. We will then focus on the relative nutritional value of different foods and their effects on the human body, including illnesses related to poor nutrition.  Finally, we will explore modern agricultural practices and discuss ways to enhance stability and sustainability in our food supply


HON 3398, Sect. 550  Special Topics:  Natural Sciences in Our Daily Life #10691 (3 credits)
MWF  2-2:50pm, LSBE 129 
Natural Science and Sustainability
Dr. Ahemd A. Heikal

This interdisciplinary, systems-thinking, student-driven course will engage the students in active learning towards discovering the role of natural sciences in our daily life as well as its social and environmental impacts. The students will be engaged in discussing contemporary scientific issues that affect their life at home, at work, on the road, health, and environment. Topics may include beauty products, energy (food, conventional and renewable sources), plastics, health care, and environment. The underlying foundational knowledge in related scientific field across many disciplines will be discussed while providing the students with many opportunities for active learning, teamwork, and communications skills as well as critical thinking.  

HON 3495 Section 550, Community Immersion and Entrepreneurship #33635 (3 credits)
Thursday, 4 to 6:50 pm
Social Science
Dr. Aparna Katre

This is a seminar course and it involves partially off-campus meetings and engagement in situ with community partners. The course is designed to facilitate long-term collaborations between the University and the Twin Ports community to respond entrepreneurially to community issues. It provides a framework for thoughtful, sustained engagement where responses to community issues are developed organically, collaboratively, and with grassroots participation. Supported by academic theories about systems thinking, entrepreneurship, and intersectionality for social change, students immerse themselves in projects to strengthen the community. The emphasis is on building a sound grasp of the topics by connecting them to community issues and entrepreneurial activities.